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ClimateXchange: Fireside Chat with Bob Litterman

October 30 @ 1:00 pm MDT

 

Climate impacts are estimated to cost the world $7.9 trillion by 2050. The latest report, prepared for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) by a committee chaired by Bob Litterman, states that climate change is already impacting nearly every facet of the economy, including infrastructure, agriculture, residential and commercial property, human health, and labor productivity. These impacts are also disproportionately burdening frontline communities along our coast that are being battered by extreme weather and sea level rise, and small businesses that lack the resources to endure climate catastrophes.

In this webinar, we will dive deep into how climate change is putting all aspects of society at risk — global financial systems, frontline communities, small businesses, environmental protection and smart growth — and the potential role for carbon pricing in addressing this worsening crisis. The webinar will have three sections:

  1. A fireside chat with Bob Litterman about the need to price carbon from his perspective of overseeing the CFTC report and as a leader in business finance and climate advocacy.
  2. A discussion with climate advocates on the implications the report and related climate risks
    – Leonardo Martinez-Diaz, Global Director of the Sustainability Finance Center at the World Resources Institute
    – Jasmine Sanders, the Executive Director of Our Climate
    – Adele Morris, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute
  3. Open Q&A with attendees

This conversation will be moderated by Christina DeConcini, the Director of Government Affairs at the World Resources Institute. This program is part of a series of forums on national climate policy co-hosted by Climate XChange and the Pricing Carbon Initiative.

Register

Details

Date:
October 30
Time:
1:00 pm
Event Category:

Venue

On line
United States

Organizer

ClimateXchange
Website:
https://climate-xchange.org/network/
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